Last update on 6 May 2013 by Dr Cécile Loï

Sarcopenia


 

Sarcopenia is a pathology characterized by a decrease in muscle mass, strength and function that exposes elderly to frailty1. At first it results in difficulties to do simple things like food shopping, climbing stairs or doing long walks.

It is mainly due to alterations in protein metabolism, insufficient protein intake, reduced physical activity, but also neuro-degenerative process or a decrease in the production and action of anabolic hormones2.

Various studies estimate that 25% of people over 70 years old and 40% over 80 would be sarcopenic3.

 


The consequences of sarcopenia


• Increased risk of infection

• Difficulties to heal
• Increased risk of falling
• Decreased quality of life
• Increased risk of hospital stay
• Increased dependence


References :

1. Cruz-Jentoft AJ, Baeyens JP, Bauer JM, Boirie Y, Cederholm T, Landi F, et al. Sarcopenia: European Consensus on Definition and Diagnosis Report of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Age Ageing. 7 janv 2010;39(4):412‑423.

2. Rolland Y, Vellas B. La sarcopénie. La Revue de Médecine Interne. févr 2009;30(2) : 150‑160.

3. Boirie Y. Physiopathological mechanism of sarcopenia. J Nutr Health Aging. oct 2009;13(8):717‑723.


Malnutrition

It is characterized by involuntary weight loss : 5 to 10% over the last 6 to 12 months compared to the usual weight. It is mainly caused by inadequate dietary intake, catabolic and / or digestive disorders. It leads to a loss of muscle mass, a decrease in immune system and a reduction of autonomy, and increased risk of fall.

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ProteoCIT for the dietary management of sarcopenia or malnutrition, especially among frail elderly.

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